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Mysterious donor saves UFO festival in Shag Harbour

An Oct. 1, 2016, bus tour visited the site of the crash of an object in the water in what is referred to the 1967 Shag Harbour UFO incident.
An Oct. 1, 2016, bus tour visited the site of the crash of an object in the water in what is referred to the 1967 Shag Harbour UFO incident.

SHAG HARBOUR, N.S. — A mysterious and anonymous donor has saved the Shag Harbour 50th anniversary UFO festival.

Last week, the Shag Harbour UFO Incident Society (SHUFOIS) revealed it had been denied $20,000 in funding it had requested from the federal government’s Canada 150 grants.

This denial knocked down the society’s plans to have a largescale event that included bringing in top speakers and experts on UFOs.

The volunteers at the society say the Shag Harbour UFO crash is the most documented UFO incident in the world and they think it is a story that should be told.

“After learning of the festival’s funding denial,” said Brock Zinck, vice-president of the SHUFOIS, “a civilian involved in the study of UFOs and related phenomenon contacted the society and, to our complete shock, offered a significant donation.”

Zinck said because of this the festival plans are reinvigorated and it will be bigger than ever imagined.

“We are back on track to make this the most epic Shag Harbour UFO Incident Festival ever,” said Zinck. “It’s going to be …" (wait for it) "… out of this world.”

Although the generous donor requested anonymity, they did provide a short statement.

“Although there is much I can’t reveal, without any hesitation I can say the Canadian Government (and the International Community it answers to) appears to be concealing what happened in and around the waters of Shag Harbour, Canada on Oct. 4, 1967.  People with the connections, notoriety and finances are working hard to challenge how we view the world around us.  Shag Harbour is one of the smoking guns that will be used to achieve this."

When the society learned of the denial in funding they started scaling back much of the festival’s plans.

“Admittedly,” Zinck said in a release, “the funding denial was an unexpected disappointment that left our society reconsidering many of our ambitious plans and guests. However, the financial anxiety and the many frowns occupying the Shag Harbour UFO Society was short lived.”

He also wondered if the government was intentionally trying to keep Shag Harbour and the UFO incident of 1967 a secret.

The society says it can't even get approval for a UFO sign on Highway 103 for the iconic fishing village.

Other Canada 150 funding

Some of the approved projects include $416,000 for an urban game of snakes and ladders in Calgary and $30,000 for a giant puppet show in the West Kootenays.

 

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