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UPDATED: Erin to bring rain and wind to Maritimes Thursday night and Friday


Karl Funk calls it a day under unsettled skies after hitting the waves off Flag Pond Beach Park in Cow Bay on Tuesday. Tropical depression 6, expected to become tropical storm Erin later Tuesday, should track northeastward toward Atlantic Canada, bringing rain to the region overnight Thursday and Friday. 
TIM KROCHAK/ The Chronicle Herald
Karl Funk calls it a day under unsettled skies after hitting the waves off Flag Pond Beach Park in Cow Bay on Tuesday. Tropical depression 6, expected to become tropical storm Erin later Tuesday, should track northeastward toward Atlantic Canada, bringing rain to the region overnight Thursday and Friday. TIM KROCHAK/ The Chronicle Herald

The remains of tropical storm Erin are expected to bring heavy rain and gusty winds to Nova Scotia and other parts of the Maritimes by week’s end.

Erin, which is expected to be downgraded to a post-tropical storm before hitting our region, should track northeastward toward Atlantic Canada on Wednesday, according to a tropical cyclone information statement posted by Environment and Natural Resources Canada just before 3 a.m.

At the time of the latest warning, the storm was still located off North Carolina, with maximum sustained winds of 65 kilometres per hour.

The advisory warns of rain and gusty winds later Thursday and into Friday.

"Rain associated with a trough of low pressure approaching from the west will spread over the western Maritimes early Thursday morning," the latest advisory said. "As Erin approaches later on Thursday, some of its moisture will feed into this trough and likely enhance the rain intensity associated with it. The heavier rain and strongest winds associated directly with post-tropical Erin should reach the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia later Thursday evening.

Maximum rainfall could exceed 100 mm in some isolated parts of these regions.

The rain will be welcomed by farmers, firefighters concerned about forest and brush blazes and Nova Scotians who fret about wells running low. The rain will also help the Lake Major reservoir in Dartmouth, where 103,000 area customers of Halifax Water have been asked to voluntarily conserve water.

“It could be what we are looking for, a perfect scenario of a storm that’s not making landfall but close enough to bring us much-needed rain,” SaltWire Network Chief Meteorologist Cindy Day said.

For more details, see her forecast here.

Strong and gusty winds will likely accompany the system, especially to the right of and near the eventual track it takes through our region, the advisory reads.

Winds are unlikely to reach warning levels of gusts to 90 kilometres per hour or higher but could still be strong enough to cause isolated power outages and minor damage, especially given that trees are still in full leaf, the advisory states.

The advisory says significant storm surge and coastal impacts from high waves are not very likely given the expected intensity and track of the storm system.

“However, some higher than normal water levels and high surf are possible near and to the right of the track, and this will be monitored closely as the system evolves over the coming days.”

Gale warnings will likely be required for waters near to the track of the storm as it passes through the region later on Thursday and Friday. Based on the current forecast intensity, marine storm force winds are not expected at this time.

Get your local weather info from Cindy Day

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