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Sidney Crosby camp an experience to remember for Shelburne girl  


COLE HARBOUR -The most feared sniper in the NHL aimed and fired twice. And a 12-year-old Shelburne County girl stopped him cold both times.  

Emma Swansburg, of Shelburne, was one of 160 children from around the world lucky enough to be chosen to take part in the Sidney Crosby Hockey School in Cole Harbour held Aug. 3-7.

She was surprised to meet the hockey superstar on the first day of the camp and she and her parents, Ralph and Tara, said they were impressed with how Crosby made an effort to speak with and help each and every child on-and-off the ice throughout the camp.

Held in Crosby’s hometown rink, the week-long event included other Nova Scotian NHL stars as well, including Nathan MacKinnon -last year’s Calder Cup Trophy winner as the top rookie in the league.

Crosby was also helped by his 19-year-old sister Taylor Crosby, who is a goalie for Northeastern University in Boston.

Taylor, who earned the nickname “Tomato” from the kids because of the sunburn she sported, gained a lot of new fans as she worked every day with Emma and her group.

“She’s nice,” said Emma. “She helped me a lot to be a better goalie.”

And when the ice is back at the Shelburne Arena, Emma is looking forward to donning her goalie gear and rejoining the Shelburne Flames. She only started playing hockey a few years ago, but quickly fell in love with the sport and enjoys the goalie position.

Her father says Emma was thrilled when she learned she was one of those chosen from the thousands who applied to take part in the hockey school.

“The first night before the camp it was hard for her to sleep,” he said. But after a full day of drills, games and scrimmages … “the next night she was out like a light.”

One other lucky Shelburne County player, Keigan Sears, the son of Troy and Jennifer Sears of Cape Sable Island, also took part in the camp.

Emma’s father Ralph said the camp was extremely well-run and that the NHL professionals who took part seemed to genuinely enjoy working with the children.

“A lot of times they were just cracking up on the ice they were having so much fun,” he said.

It was an experience Emma says she won’t forget and would recommend for any young hockey player.

“I liked it a lot,” she said.

Emma Swansburg, of Shelburne, was one of 160 children from around the world lucky enough to be chosen to take part in the Sidney Crosby Hockey School in Cole Harbour held Aug. 3-7.

She was surprised to meet the hockey superstar on the first day of the camp and she and her parents, Ralph and Tara, said they were impressed with how Crosby made an effort to speak with and help each and every child on-and-off the ice throughout the camp.

Held in Crosby’s hometown rink, the week-long event included other Nova Scotian NHL stars as well, including Nathan MacKinnon -last year’s Calder Cup Trophy winner as the top rookie in the league.

Crosby was also helped by his 19-year-old sister Taylor Crosby, who is a goalie for Northeastern University in Boston.

Taylor, who earned the nickname “Tomato” from the kids because of the sunburn she sported, gained a lot of new fans as she worked every day with Emma and her group.

“She’s nice,” said Emma. “She helped me a lot to be a better goalie.”

And when the ice is back at the Shelburne Arena, Emma is looking forward to donning her goalie gear and rejoining the Shelburne Flames. She only started playing hockey a few years ago, but quickly fell in love with the sport and enjoys the goalie position.

Her father says Emma was thrilled when she learned she was one of those chosen from the thousands who applied to take part in the hockey school.

“The first night before the camp it was hard for her to sleep,” he said. But after a full day of drills, games and scrimmages … “the next night she was out like a light.”

One other lucky Shelburne County player, Keigan Sears, the son of Troy and Jennifer Sears of Cape Sable Island, also took part in the camp.

Emma’s father Ralph said the camp was extremely well-run and that the NHL professionals who took part seemed to genuinely enjoy working with the children.

“A lot of times they were just cracking up on the ice they were having so much fun,” he said.

It was an experience Emma says she won’t forget and would recommend for any young hockey player.

“I liked it a lot,” she said.

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