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What business is like in Digby during a power outage

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DIGBY, NS – No power doesn’t have to mean no business.

After a storm during the morning of June 20, a power outage affecting over 5,000 people in Digby County caused a major power outage in the Town of Digby.

Several businesses on Water Street were stating they remained open for business despite the lack of power by keeping their doors ajar.

Here’s a look at three such businesses, and what it’s like for them during a power outage.

 

Second Look: Crafts, Antiques and Gifts

The Second Look store.

Michelle Emin has owned and operated the Second Look shop for 13 years.
She said while the power outage made transactions impossible at her store, it was a good day for meeting people and having them look around the store, getting familiar with what it has to offer.
“I met a German couple in here today, which was neat,” she said.
“We had a really great afternoon talking with everyone.”
She was talking with Leo Zakhour, who said to her “I've sold around 30 ice creams since the power went out. It’s a great day for business for me!"

 

Recardo’s Convenience

Leo Zakhour, who owns Recardo’s Convenience and Recardo’s Pizza & Donair with his wife Evelyn.

Leo runs Recardo’s Convenience while his wife Evelyn runs the pizza shop next door.
Leo did indeed have a good day for his ice cream. Evelyn also had a good day for pizza since people couldn’t cook at home.
“People never go hungry when I’m open!” she laughed.
She said the store operates business as usual – albeit minus an interact machine – when power outages happen.
Leo also has backup generators which come in handy on such occasions as Lobster Bash, when the hurricane struck. Leo’s coffee machines and interact machine attracted plenty when power was out everywhere else.

 

Marshalls Gifts and Souvenirs

Sharon Marshall, manager and owner of Marshalls Gifts and Souvenirs.

Sharon Marshall is the manager and owner of Marshalls Gifts and Souvenirs.
Her shop is fully equipped for power outage situations.
“We have customers that come rain or shine. We equip them with flashlights so they can still roam around the store,” she said.
Her store attracted visitors from British Columbia, Ontario and the United Kingdom even while the power was out.
After 28 years, she’s a power outage pro and manages things the old way.
“We never really close, and I hand calculate everything during these times. If the customer wants, we can still deal with cash,” she said.

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